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Injury Series Part 3 - Survival Guide for Handling The Long Shutdown

In the first couple of blogs in this series, I focused on ways to (hopefully) still maintain some fitness and work through (and beyond) smaller, day-to-day aches and pains. But, sometimes, despite our best efforts, acute injuries happen (hi, bike crashes), or, for one (usually competitive training motive-related) reason or another, the overuse ones become serious enough to warrant a more extended shutdown. We all fear this happening for a reason-it, in a word, sucks. With the exception of the serious, truly awful bike accidents that result in permanent damage (which are beyond the scope of what’s discussed in this post), maybe, in the great scheme of medical problems, an orthopedic injury that will heal in a few months might not be at the top of the list of bad things that can happen to a body. But still-acutely broken bones, stress fractures, soft tissue tears, post-op recoveries-none of it is fun. We chose to pursue triathlon because, at some level, it brings some combination of enjoyment, satisfaction, connection, community, and a sense of accomplishment to their lives, and injury results in the temporary loss of that. So, what do we do when faced with a longer shutdown that keeps us more significantly out of training and competing?
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Archive for 15 February, 2022
In the first couple of blogs in this series, I focused on ways to (hopefully) still maintain some fitness and work through (and beyond) smaller, day-to-day aches and pains. But, sometimes, despite our best efforts, acute injuries happen (hi, bike crashes), or, for one (usually competitive training motive-related) reason or another, the overuse ones become serious enough to warrant a more extended shutdown. We all fear this happening for a reason-it, in a word, sucks. With the exception of the serious, truly awful bike accidents that result in permanent damage (which are beyond the scope of what’s discussed in this post), maybe, in the great scheme of medical problems, an orthopedic injury that will heal in a few months might not be at the top of the list of bad things that can happen to a body. But still-acutely broken bones, stress fractures, soft tissue tears, post-op recoveries-none of it is fun. We chose to pursue triathlon because, at some level, it brings some combination of enjoyment, satisfaction, connection, community, and a sense of accomplishment to their lives, and injury results in the temporary loss of that. So, what do we do when faced with a longer shutdown that keeps us more significantly out of training and competing?